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Paradigm PBK-1 Perfect Bass Kit - Setup Illustration

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Paradigm PBK-1 Perfect Bass Kit - Setup Illustration

Paradigm PBK-1 Perfect Bass Kit - Setup Illustration

Photo (c) Robert Silva - Licensed to About.com
Here is a look at how you set up the Paradigm PBK Perfect Bass Kit.

Starting on the right is the provided microphone mounted on the microphone stand. The microphone is connected to the Laptop PC via a provided USB cable.

In the center of the photo is a Laptop PC with the Paradigm PBK Perfect Bass Kit installed. In this photo, the Laptop is displaying a sample test result generated by the Kit.

On the right side, is the Paradigm SE Sub with a USB cable connected between the subwoofer and Laptop.

Note: This photo is for illustration purposes, the microphone would normally be placed at the listening position and the subwoofer would be on the floor.

How The Paradigm PBK Perfect Bass Kit Works

The Paradigm PBK Perfect Bass Kit works by having your PC or Laptop send a series of test signals to the subwoofer via a USB connection. As the test signals are generated by the subwoofer and fill the room, they are picked up by the microphone, which, in turn, sends the signal back to the PC via a second USB connection.

Once a series of test signals is collected by the PC, the software calculates the results and matches the results against a reference curve. The software then corrects the subwoofer's response that is affected by room characteristics to more closely match the reference curve, thus optimizing subwoofer performance as much as possible for your specific listening space, correcting for the negative effects that the room adds to the mix.

Once this process is completed, the results are displayed in graph form and can also be saved in your PC for future reference.

It is also important to note that this process should be completed before you connect your subwoofer to your home theater system and make further adjustments either by a equalization/room correction system or via manual tweaking using your ear or a sound meter.

For a closer look at the graph, proceed to the next two photos...

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